Book of the Week

You’re Invited to Septuagint Studies: Refuse at Your Peril!

You’re invited to Septuagint studies…again! Karen Jobes and Moisés Silva have revised and expanded their fantastic introduction to the blooming field of Septuagint studies. And we mean it: refuse at your peril. If you haven’t yet read a good introduction to this field, there are several reasons why you should, and many reasons why Jobes and Silva is the best place to start….

0
Read More

A Comprehensive Guide to the Language, Meaning, Theology, and Homiletics of Malachi

Want to refresh and improve your Hebrew while studying an OT prophet closely? I’m always on the lookout for resources that help you naturally improve your biblical language skills. I love some of the NT Greek guides that are being published, and the Baylor Handbooks on the Hebrew Old Testament are helpful as well. However, they are not intended to be commentaries on the meaning of the text, nor do they deal with theology. Malachi Then and Now Allen P. Ross has…

3
Read More

What about Free Will? The Age-Old Question, Newly Explored

When I first read the introduction to this book, I couldn’t help but think of myself 10 years ago. I had recently discovered the “doctrines of grace” and was exploring them and studying Scripture to sort things out. I could recall my own experiences as I read through the backstory to this book given by the author, Scott Christensen….

0
Read More

A Truly Inspiring Introduction to Biblical Hermeneutics from Craig Bartholomew

There many introductions to biblical hermeneutics, but none have truly inspired me in the many ways Craig Bartholomew’s has. His Introducing Biblical Hermeneutics is truly a tour de force of the many methodologies, historical precedents, and disciplines that are wrapped up in the process of interpreting the Bible. This book has inspired me in at least two ways. First, I’ve never seen another hermeneutics textbook that includes a chapter on lectio divina and the necessity of listening to Scripture, as Bartholomew does in ch. 2. I was inspired…

1
Read More

It’s Time to Rethink Traditional Covenantal Theology

Ever since Johannes Cocceius in the seventeenth century, the dominant model for federal or covenantal theology has been the Covenant of Works — Covenant of Grace dichotomy. This bi-covenantal scheme holds that Adam was under the Covenant of Works, potentially with the reward for obedience of eternal life, while all covenants after the fall were covenants of….

0
Read More

Five Myths about the New Testament You Should Re-Examine

David Croteau has written a unique book with a sneaky purpose: to teach good hermeneutics. Many hermeneutics textbooks spend hundreds of pages on theory with some examples here and there. But not many books have been written with only examples of good exegesis for the purpose of teaching good exegesis….

1
Read More

The Most Important Modern Theological Discussion

Feel free to push back, but I dare say that the most important modern theological discussion is the relationship between Israel and the Church.

It all started in the early church: who were these “Christians?” Of course they were Jews, but by the end of the first century we had the famous….

0
Read More
Contact

General & Advertising: todd@exegeticaltools.com
Podcast: travis@exegeticaltools.com