New Testament

When Did the New Testament Become Scripture?

Many modern scholars have settled on c. AD 200 as the earliest period at which the New Testament writings were considered Scripture. Irenaeus has been called the “principal architect” of the canon, while another scholar has said Irenaeus “essentially created the core of the New Testament canon of Holy Scripture.” But a fresh examination of the evidence suggests that the New Testament writings were considered Scripture far earlier than Irenaeus….

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Paul and His Recent Interpreters, by N. T. Wright

In 1911, Albert Schweitzer wrote Paul and His Interpreters, which not only summarized the history of Pauline interpretation but also located Paul within Judaism. In the last century there has been a stream of different approaches to Paul, from classical liberalism, to a history….

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Interview with Charles Lee Irons: Syntax, Exegesis, and Forthcoming

This week we featured Charles Lee Irons’ work, A Syntax Guide for Readers of the Greek New Testament, as our Book of the Week. And it is truly a resource to keep right next to your Greek New Testament. It could shave many precious minutes off your sermon preparation and keep you from flipping through your intermediate syntax categories every few minutes….

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Interview with Andreas Kostenberger on Approaching New Testament Introduction

New Testament introduction is an area that every seminary student must wade through because it is foundational to how we understand our Scriptures. Textbooks must therefore address the most critical issues, but Evangelical textbooks have an additional task of promoting the spiritual growth of students. The Cradle, the Cross, and the Crown (2nd ed.) is a textbook that strikes an elegant balance, about which you can read more here. Andreas Köstenberger, co-author along with Scott Kellum and Chuck Quarles, was kind enough to…

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Keep Several New Testament Intros on Your Shelf, and Make Sure This is One of Them

It’s not often I get excited about a New Testament introduction textbook, but Köstenberger , Kellum, and Quarles have exceeded expectations. Their new work, The Cradle, the Cross, and the Crown: An Introduction to the New Testament, is a tour de force for issues related to the NT. At 1,100+ pages, this work leaves no stone unturned and should be welcomed by NT professors, pastors, and students alike. Even better, this new second edition is completely updated with the latest scholarship. Contents The work divides…

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All That the Prophets Have Declared: The Appropriation of Scripture in the Emergence of Christianity, ed. Matthew Malcolm

This book was the product of a symposium in Perth Australia at Trinity Theological College. Key speakers were Larry Hurtado, Roland Deines, Allan Chapple, and Mark Seifrid. As the title indicates, the papers focused on the use of Scripture in early Christianity and what we can glean from that for knowledge about the emergence of early Christianity, and topic very well connected with Hurtado’s work….

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Five Myths about the New Testament You Should Re-Examine

David Croteau has written a unique book with a sneaky purpose: to teach good hermeneutics. Many hermeneutics textbooks spend hundreds of pages on theory with some examples here and there. But not many books have been written with only examples of good exegesis for the purpose of teaching good exegesis….

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