Exegesis

Isaiah for Everyone, by John Goldingay

John Goldingay is no slouch in Isaianic studies. In 2005, he published The Message of Isaiah 40-55: A Literary-Theological Commentary. Last year, he replaced the old International Critical Commentary volumes on Isaiah by publishing the volumes on Isaiah 40-55 and Isaiah 56-66, and also published Theology of the Book of Isaiah.

In this small book, Goldingay tries to make Isaiah accessible for everyone….

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Tom Schreiner Helps You Bring Biblical Theology to the Pulpit

The major contribution of each volume, however, is a thorough discussion of the most important themes of the biblical book in relation to the canon as a whole. This format allows each contributor to ground biblical theology, as is proper, in an appropriate appraisal of the relevant historical and literary features of a particular book….

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A Guide to Every Greek Phrase in Philippians: A Huge Time-Saver for Students and Pastors

Preparing a sermon on difficult texts can be extremely time-consuming. In Philippians 1, what does Paul mean when he says “I know that through your prayers and the help of the Spirit of Jesus Christ this will turn out for my salvation” (1:19)? How should the difficult Greek phrase τοῦτο φρονεῖτε ἐν ὑμῖν ὃ καὶ ἐν Χριστῷ Ἰησοῦ (2:5) be understood? What does the word ἁρπαγμὸν mean in 2:6? To give one more example, what about everyone’s favorite word in Philippians, σκύβαλα – just exactly how strong is that word? For each of these exegetical problems, and the many more you would find in almost every paragraph of Philippians, you might need to consult a few commentaries and a couple lexicons, assuming you’re working from the Greek….

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Philippians (Exegetical Guide to the Greek New Testament), by Joseph Hellerman

This handbook on the Greek text of Philippians is part of B&H Academic’s EGGNT series, several volumes of which we have reviewed. Each volume is aimed at intermediate Greek readers and focuses on syntax, vocabulary, and grammar. But each volume is also slightly distinctive, given an author’s chosen emphases.

Hellerman begins with a brief commentary introduction, concluding that Paul wrote the letter from Rome. He writes one long paragraph on aspect and Aktionsart….

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Weekly Roundup August 7, 2015

Blogs

Brian Davidson at the Center for Ancient Christian Studies interviewed Ken Penner on his forthcoming book, The Verbal System of the Dead Sea Scrolls, which discusses how the Hebrew language evolved between the Bible and the Mishnah.

Larry Hurtado discusses the issue of the history of the emergence of orthodoxy….

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Review of Bibleworks 10, Part 1: Interface and Design

This is part 1 of our review of BibleWorks 10. This post will discuss the interface and design of BibleWorks, which I have always appreciated the most about the program because of its simplicity and down-to-business look. One friend says it looks like it was built for MS-DOS, which was a humorous exaggeration, but it truly is a simple, text-based design for serious exegetes. Moreoever, it’s lightweight and loads and operates far quicker than Logos, which is a beast even on my brand new, high quality Lenovo Yoga Pro 2. Searches on BW are nearly instantaneous and can be quite complex, as I’ll demonstrate in future posts. For now, let’s look at this simple, yet elegant design….

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Galatians (Paideia Commentaries on the New Testament), by Peter Oakes

This Galatians commentary is concise, well-informed, accessible, and obviously filled with an immense amount of research and thought – not only thought about Galatians’ theology, but also about methodology. Peter Oakes uses knowledge from various disciplines, such as archaeology, sociology, linguistics, and historical background to enlighten our reading of Galatians….

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